2019 FAPA President's Gold

Medal Winner

“War Calls, Love Cries” is Mark’s debut novel, about an innocent farmboy from upstate New York whose dreams are shattered when the Civil War erupts.

WAR CALLS, LOVE CRIES

MARK BARIE'S NEW BOOK
NOW AVAILABLE

I could picture this as a Hallmark movie, or

History Channel or PBS even. - Linda C.

 

Mark's 5 Reasons to Pen a Book

Mark Barie Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg Nationa Military Park Museum

The author with Mr. Lincoln at the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center

Bravo...hurry with your next novel.

- Joanne U.

My    Book
Barie_3DWarCalls459x715.png

Finalist, 2019 Eric Hoffer Award for Historical Fiction

Isaac Wells is an innocent farm boy living in upstate New York. His plans for law school and a perfect life with the girl of his dreams, are shattered by a treacherous brother and the onset of a horrible Civil War.

The fast-moving historical narrative in this book is accurate, the emotional roller coaster ride is heart wrenching, and the result is a riveting must-read book that you will think about and talk about for a long time.

“War Calls, Love Cries” is the kind of book you will cherish and the perfect gift for someone you love!

Finished in two days,

could not put it down - Ann L.

2019 FAPA Gold

Medal Winner

 

$100 Gift 

Card

Testimonials/Video

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WOW, all I can say is WOW...received your book yesterday...read it once...I read 3-5 books a week. I have at least 2000 books in my home because  I like to collect all authors with complete collections...This book is sooooooo good. Your character development is so fine, I could picture this as a Hallmark movie along with a movie on the History channel...PBS even!!! The plot twists with unexpected historical references. Cried a couple of times...

- Linda C.

"The Book" arrived last night - very late (Mail delivery at 8.00pm)!

WOW!!! - Great job! It was totally not what I expected. I could not put it down! Spent way past bedtime reading. Congrats again; REALLY good job.

- Una

War Calls Love Cries is a literary treat for anyone with an interest in American History and the Civil War.
Beyond the quality and quantity of historical references, the book is very relatable and often reminded me of the trials and tribulations my Grandparents had to endure when War called.

- James W.

Really enjoyed the characters and the local history throughout. Very engaging with lots of twists and surprises. Highly recommend.

- SAB

War Calls, Love Cries is a book for history lovers, and for those wanting to learn more about the north country in the 1800's. Isaac and Rebecca are captivating protagonists. By switching between the North Country and the war, the author keeps the reader engrossed. The Civil War was well-researched and very descriptive, to give the reader a good visual image.
Hoping there is another book in the works.

- Amazon Customer

Finished this in 2 days because I could not put it down! Would have been  in one day, but had to work, eat, sleep, etc. Hate it when life gets in the way. Retirement in 39 days will solve that, but back to this amazing book. It was so captivating to read about Isaac's life and the tough decisions he made. The outcome was so happy and sad (I dont want to give anything away here). I will be getting copies for my siblings for Christmas. The author obviously did his homework, and has a great imagination. The detail made me feel like I was there. Loved the book, great job--now write the sequel!!

- Ann L.

I have to admit I was pleasantly surprised reading this book as I usually avoid war stories, and while it does share a lot of historical information about the Civil war, the main focus is how the war affects one man in particular. Isaac Wells’ vision of being a lawyer is shattered quite early on in this story and we read how this broken dream and other circumstances in his life cause him to leave his family farm and enlist as a union soldier in the Civil War. When he finally returns home, he is a completely changed man even though he was gone only a few short years.

The story line in this book attracted my interest from the very beginning and I found myself wanting to continue reading at the end of each chapter to see what life held in store for Isaac. The colorful descriptions of the various settings in the book and the realistic characters portrayed by the author make for a very enjoyable read. I highly recommend this book especially if you have any interest at all in the Civil War. It is a well-researched book. It is also an incredibly good story, and that is what counts.

- Jean W.

I am more than half done reading your book and have a hard time putting it down. Bravo....hurry with your next novel.

- Joanne Ullery

To all my friends who love Civil War history combined with a nice love story, this is an excellent, fast read that keeps your attention and tugs at your heart strings. You can purchase the book on Amazon. Enjoy!

- Julie Racine-Parshall

A great book, great detail. I recommend it to everyone. It is available on Amazon.

- Greg Kelley

It was our pleasure to have you here at the library. And a big thank you for putting on such a wonderful program. We had such a great turnout and have heard nothing but good reviews from our patrons, they really enjoyed your speaking. Also thank you again for your generous donations to our collection. We look forward to working with you again in the future.

-- Sonya E. Chapa, Library Specialist

Okeechobee County Public Library

Mark, I did read your book,  actually finished in 2 days. It was a quick read, fast moving..so good.

Thumbs up!

You certainly followed your publishers advice re leave out any extraneous verbiage, details.

Definitely would be appropriate for students.  (The intimate scenes maybe not so, but then we've come a long way since my time).

Personally, I would have liked more detail, maps of protagonists journey. Your talk gave me more information than the book. ( as the rats, escape) That is not a criticism, just me. I always slow down when it comes to battles, geography, logistics.  

You speak so well, clearly.  It's a pleasure to listen to you, never boring. The research you put into it was incredible.    

 

I do love history especially American. My first book given to me as a "displaced person" from sponsor, "Aunt Helen", was " Our Nation", (from the discovery by Chris Columbus through Revolutionary War),  followed by "Calico Captive" the fictional story based on true events of French and Indian Wars, reread numerous times. 

 

I look forward to your next book on the Revolutionary War. 

Five stars for you, my friend!

- Henny

 
 

You speak so well, clearly.

Its a pleasure to listen to you, never boring. The research you put into it was incredible.

- Henny

Media & Events
If you would like this award-winning author to 
speak to your group, please contact Mark directly at 518.593.3754 or email him at authormarkbarie@gmail.com
 

New work chronicles civil war

An ancestor inspired Mark Barie’s historical fiction - February 7, 2019

Mark Barie chronicles the Civil War in his new book “War Calls, Love Cries.”

TICONDEROGA | Mark Barie had written several important, tightly documented, history books when he decided to delve into historical fiction. The experience, he said, was liberating.

Barie’s new book, “War Calls, Love Cries,” spots his hero, Isaac Wells, at historically significant events throughout the Civil War, and expounds on scenes that played out more than 150 years ago. The benefit of fiction, Barie said, is that scholarly nitpicking becomes less of a factor.

“Over the course of four books, I became a bit tired of footnotes,” he said.

Footnoted or not, Barie’s novel sticks close to the documented facts. The inspiration, he said, came from the discovery of a great-great grandfather of his who fought in the war.

“It was my chance to marry my family to Lincoln,” he said. Barie said he had been a Lincoln fan prior to his novel, and his further research cemented his convictions.

He said he began studying Lincoln when he was young, and started collecting books about his favorite pol. His interest in the time period, and with Lincoln, made the book easier to write, and produced nuggets he could incorporate into his work.

That’s typical of historical fiction, he said, and a reason why many such novels take a long time to write. But owing to his knowledge of the era, the book came together in about a year. Still, there were hiccups.

Barie said he accidentally referred to a rubber sheet as “plastic,” which people with a bent toward constructive criticism helpfully pointed out hadn’t been invented yet. “When you write a book like this you are constantly looking for mistakes; it’s a never-ending process,” he said. But the scenes in his book play out with authenticity as, for example, a man dying on the battlefield asks for a beer — and then says nothing more.

To promote his book, Barie lectures on little known Civil War-era facts — among them that men were more likely to die of disease than bullets, and when John Wilkes Booth came to Washington to shoot the president, he slept in the same boarding house where Lincoln was taken and where he died.

Barie, a well-known figure in North Country political and economic development circles, said health problems forced him into retirement, but that he soon discovered that “man does not live by golf alone.”

Barie’s writing credits include, “A Miracle Comes to Vermont,” the biography of a Catholic priest in Alburgh, Vermont; “Crossing the Line,” a collaborative effort with his wife Christine Racine, which details the history of the border at Rouses Point and Champlain; “The President of Plattsburgh: The Story of Smith Weed,” the first-ever biography of Smith Weed, a prominent 19th-century lawyer, business tycoon, politician and philanthropist from Plattsburgh, New York; and “The Boat People of Champlain,” another collaborative effort with his wife and the heretofore untold story of the boat-building industry that existed in the village of Champlain long ago.He has two more historical fictions in the works, based on the French and Indian War and the American Revolution.

“Hopefully by the time I get to my third book I’ll be a good writer,” he joked.

December 6, 2018

February 28, 2019

Write Stuff: Five mistakes by amateur authors 

1. Lousy editing

You edited your own manuscript without professional help, and as a result there are grammatical and typographical errors in your book. This is a sure sign of an amateur author and likely to turn off both readers and publishers.

2. Amateur cover art

You decided to scrimp on the cover art and your book cover looks like a sixth-grader did it ... for free. This is a huge mistake. People DO judge a book by its cover.

3. Talking heads

This means that you wrote all or part of your book from the point of view of more than one person. This is acceptable, (see third-person omniscient) but only if you clearly indicate when the point of view has changed. Use chapter headings, decorative stops between paragraphs, changes in scenery or time periods, or even a revealing first line in the new paragraph to alert the reader that a different “head” in your book is now doing the thinking.

4. No website

Every author should have a website, and it should be about more than just your most recent book. You, your photo, your upcoming schedule, testimonials, a regular column, contests, and anything else that might attract readers or get them to give you an email address, each are candidates for inclusion. Websites are advertisements for the author and must be constantly revised. Authors who have poorly designed websites are not much better off than those authors with no website.

5. No email list

The coin of the realm in the publishing world is an author’s email list. The people on your email list are your preferred audience, your most likely supporters, and your best prospects for book sales. Before you put the first word on paper, begin the process of collecting email addresses. Start with family and friends, and from that point on you must solicit email addresses everywhere you go.

At book signings, speaking engagements, author events and social occasions, swap your business card for their email address. I use Constant Contact to stay in touch with my email buddies and to ensure that “friends” who wish to “unsubscribe” are able to do so with relative ease.

Mark Barie is the author of “ War Calls, Love Cries”, a Civil War love story, available on Amazon, or by contacting the author at markbarie.

com, authormarkbarie@gmail.com.

Mark Barie

March 26, 2019

Write stuff: Five traps for new authors to avoid

 

New authors should be aware of a number of traps which could cost them time and money. There are at least five.

1 Awards

For a fee, sometimes substantial, you can enter your book in dozens of contests. But be careful. Some competitions are nothing more than money-makers for the sponsor. In addition, the so-called “judges” in such contests are neither qualified nor respectable. Research each contest you enter, confirming its longtime existence, its reputation in the industry and its process for determining the winners. Without such research, you will be a loser, for sure.

2 Author conferences/book fairs

Before you spend money on registrations, travel costs, lodging expenses and display materials, do your homework. Does the conference/ book fair you wish to attend offer what you need? For example, will there be tips on writing, editing and publishing from experienced authors?

If it is a book fair, will there be substantial aisle traffic with potential book buyers, or simply a bunch of other authors also trying to sell their books. Check out the history of the conference/book fair. Organizers should be willing and able to provide you with the type and number of attendees they have attracted in the past. 

Attending one of these affairs without first doing your homework is foolish and quite possibly very expensive.

3 Book reviews

Be cautious of any organization that offers to do a review of your book for a fee. If all they do is provide raving reviews for anyone willing to cough up some money, you know that their review is worthless—to both you and your potential readers. Contact the organization. Ask for references and look for a history of consumer complaints, if any. Companies that do useless reviews will be obvious.

4 Book promotions sites

Once you become an author, you will discover a plethora of companies that want to promote your book. For a fee, of course. Exercise great caution when dealing with these firms. Do they have a proven track record? Are their customers pleased with the results ... or not? Exactly how do they promote your book and what, if any, results are they willing to guarantee, or at least predict.

Marketing your book is your chief responsibility and contracting with someone else to do your job is rarely successful.

5 Vanity presses

If you are paying a company to publish your book and they appear to publish every author that comes through their door, you are most likely dealing with a vanity press. It is acceptable to pay for professional services like editing, layout, cover design and website construction. It is not acceptable to pay a “publishing company” for banging out a book that fails to meet even the minimum industry standards and will make you the laughingstock of your industry.

Mark Barie is the author of several books. His most recent novel “ War Calls, Love Cries” is available at amazon.com or at MarkBarie.com.

May 2, 2019

Write stuff: Five tips for historical fiction 

 

1 Research, research, research

Readers of historical fiction demand that the author accomplish the required research. How your characters talk, how they dress, what they do for a living, and the normal activities of that time, must all be accurate. In my novel War Calls, Love Cries, I refer to a rubber sheet. A dozen pages later I called it a plastic sheet. Plastic was not invented until 50 years later. Oops!

2 Be historically accurate

Historical fiction does not give you permission to change or rearrange the events of history. If you can Google it, so can your readers. Any narrative which includes well-known events or people must be accurate.

3 Use explanatory notes

It is not unusual to take small liberties with minor historical events and explain it at the back of your book in a series of footnotes. A good example would be the description of two particular events as having occurred just days apart, when in fact the second event occurred a month later. These minor changes are not usually a problem.

4 Blend your character into history

By this I mean insert your character into the major events of that day.

How did your characters react to natural and man-made disasters, political events, or anything else of significance? If the characters are not genuine, it won’t matter if the events are historically correct.

Your readers will be disappointed.

5 Start early

Historical fiction is a time-consuming and tedious process.

Experienced writers will tell you that almost every paragraph requires at least some research. At times, it takes hours of research just to confirm or abandon a particular sentence. Pick any time period you wish. Do you know the mode of transportation, the commonly eaten foodstuffs, what a woman wore on her wedding day, a day’s wages, the average man’s height, a child’s playthings, or the cost of a rented room? All of these facts are critical to the author’s most important task, which is transporting the reader to a specific time and place.

Mark Barie is the author of War Calls, Love Cries, a Civil War love story, available at amazon.com, or by contacting him at markbarie.com or authormarkbarie@gmail.com.

This Week’s Featured Author –Mark L. Barie

Article by: Angelina Assanti

In this week’s edition of “Between the Covers,” we feature award-winning author, Mark Barie.

Mark is a native New Yorker but lives in Florida now with his wife and sometimes-co-author, Christine Racine. His three first books are set in the northeast. His latest is a civil-war era novel.“My first novel, War Calls, Love Cries was published in October of 2018. This year my first novel was designated as a Finalist in the Eric Hoffer competition. And in the same week, I received notice that my book is a Medalist in the annual FAPA competition for Historical Fiction. That was a great week and definitely a ‘defining’ moment.”

Develop a Speech

Your talk should be much more than a speech which promotes your book. Talk about becoming an author, about the surprises that you discovered while writing your book, or even a how-to speech about the do's and don'ts of writing, research, and marketing. But do your research and be comfortable with your topic. And remember even Winston Churchill, the great prime minister, practiced his speeches seven times each!

Go online 

Google the email or street address for every community service organization in your county (Kiwanis, Rotary, Lions, etc.). They are usually struggling to find speakers for their weekly programs. Send a letter to a named individual or to the club secretary, and then wait for your phone to ring. It will.

 

Look for other speaking opportunities

Approach libraries, museums, bookstores and historical societies, if applicable. Offer your talk at no charge and consider the donation of a signed copy of your book, for the library's collection or for the service club to raffle. Have bookmarks and business cardsavailable for your audience. Circulate signup sheets (emails) for a free prize in a drawing which will occur at a later date. That is a great way to grow your mailing list!

Do a press release before and after each talk

It may or may not get published, but even if a small percentage of your press releases make the newspaper, it’s free advertising for you.

 

Expand your horizons

After you have exhausted all of the possible speaking venues in your county, move onto the next county. Collect references (names and phone numbers) along the way and use them in your next series of pre-approach letters.

Conclusion

No one will promote your book or your career as an author better than you. Speaking in public is one of the easiest and least expensive ways in which to establish yourself as a credible author.

Mark Barie is the nationally recognized award-winning Sebring author of War Calls, Love Cries, a Civil War love story available on Amazon. Barie can be reached at authormarkbarie@gmail.com.

A well-researched book...an incredibly good story

- Jean W. 

Contact Us

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For any media inquiries, please contact author Mark Barie or

Jeff Schlesinger at Barringer Publishing - js@barringerpublishing.com

518.593.3754

3915 Vilabella Drive, Sebring, Florida 33872

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